Crypto Market Recovers from Fall, But Could Bitcoin Price Fall to $5,000?

After recording one of the worst sell-offs in all of 2018, the crypto market has experienced a minor corrective rally, adding $8 billion to its valuation.

The Bitcoin (BTC) price is approaching a resistance level at $5,600, a minor resistance level BTC will have to surpass to potentially eye a rally to $5,800 and potentially re-enter the $6,000 region.

Since August, BTC had defended the $6,000 support level, which has since turned into a major resistance level. Hence, if BTC initiates a corrective rally throughout the next three to four days to the $6,000 level, then it will be possible for the dominant cryptocurrency to end 2018 with a positive note.

However, if BTC struggles to breakout of the $6,000 level, then it will be difficult for the market to escape its low price range by the end of 2018.

Bitcoin Downtrend Still Possible

A further downward movement by Bitcoin is still possible from the mid-$5,000 zone. Cryptocurrency trader and technical analyst DonAlt said that BTC had a decent daily movement on November 16, but it will need to show some momentum in the high $5,000 region to confirm a positive short-term movement.

“It’s been a good day for BTC. That doesn’t change the fact that we’re approaching resistance. On the charts are the three setups that I’d be willing to trade. S/R flip or rejection on red, long green or just a straight up nuke from here.”

Crypto Rand, a respected digital asset analyst, stated that a fall to the $4,800 to $5,000 range is possible, given that technical indicators have not shown any signs of a bottom.

View image on Twitter

Crypto Rand@crypto_rand

I don’t see any bottom signal yet.

My target is in the $4,800-$5,000 range.

Prior to the sudden 11 percent drop of BTC, Willy Woo, a Bitcoin analyst and the founder of Woobull.com, said that BTC demonstrated a typical sell signal. Woo analyzed both technical and fundamental indicators of BTC including the Bitcoin network’s transaction volume, to predict a downtrend.

“This last reading of our blockchain and macro market indicators is still in play. What has changed is that NVTS has now broken its support, typically a sell signal,” said Woo, adding that all of his indicators show a bearish trend. “All our blockchain indicators remain bearish. NVT, NVTS, MVRV, BNM, NVM. They are experimental but have served to make very correct calls to date, even when traditional on-exchange indicators were reading to the contrary.”

The volume of BTC remains at $6 billion, still at a high level due to the spike in daily volume on November 14. On Wednesday, the volume of BTC temporarily spiked to $8 billion, doubling its volume within a three-day span.

Independent Price Movements

Over the last 24 hours, Ripple (XRP) and Stellar (XLM) recorded an increase in price in the range of 2 to 4 percent. Primarily because of the downtrend of BTC, major cryptocurrencies and small tokens have started to demonstrate independent price movements.

A lack of dependence on BTC can be considered as a positive change in the market, which relied on the short-term price trend of Bitcoin for at least the past four months.

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Voting rights, LGBT rights, marijuana, and immigration: The night in ballot measures

State passes largest expansion of voting rights in decades as Massachusetts affirms transgender protections.

Four more states voted on the legalization of marijuana.

It’s not all about the red v blue. In dozens of states, voters cast ballots on Tuesday on issues ranging from voting rights and climate change to gun control and taxing tech to fund homeless services. Four states will see voters weigh in on the Obamacare Medicaid expansion, while Massachusetts voters will have a chance to reaffirm (or reject) a measure protecting the rights of transgender people.

We’ll be updating this story all night as the results come in, so stay tuned …

Voting rights

Last-minute lawsuits, long lines, voter roll purges, and inconvenient polling places – Americans’ ability to exercise their right to vote has been under pressure since the supreme court invalidated parts of the Voting Rights Act in 2013.

Five states had voting rights issues on their ballots tonight, including Florida, where voters chose to restore the franchise to 1.5 million people who were convicted of felonies and have completed their sentences. Activists who fought to pass Amendment 4 cheered the victory, which represents the largest expansion of voting rights in decades.

Maryland approved a measure that will expand voting rights by allowing same-day registration, and Nevada enacted automatic voter registration when drivers have contact with the department of motor vehicles.

Meanwhile, North Carolina and Arkansas both passed constitutional amendments requiring voters to provide photo IDs to vote – measures that generally have the effect of restricting the voting rights of the poor and elderly.

Tech tax for the homeless

A controversial measure that will levy a tax against the largest businesses in San Francisco to fund housing and services for the homeless has passed. The 0.5% gross receipts tax on companies with revenues over $50m had touched off a battle between the city’s tech billionaires, with the Salesforce CEO, Marc Benioff, publicly feuding with Twitter’s Jack Dorsey and other tech titans who complained the tax was unfair.

Another California housing measure, Proposition 10, which would have allowed cities to enact rent control measures, failed.

Transgender rights

Actor Laverne Cox poses with supporters of a 2016 Massachusetts law that protects transgender people from discrimination.
 Actor Laverne Cox poses with supporters of a 2016 Massachusetts law that protects transgender people from discrimination. Photograph: Josh Wood for the Guardian

A Massachusetts civil rights law came under attack this year with Question 3, which sought to repeal the 2016 state law banning discrimination against transgender people. But voters rejected the measure, making Massachusetts the first state to affirm transgender rights in a statewide vote.

Reproductive rights

It was a tough night for reproductive rights, with voters in two staunchly Republican states approving measures to restrict abortion. Alabama passed a constitutional amendment to recognize the “right to life” of fetuses and deny public funding for abortion. West Virginia also passed a constitutional amendment declaring that the state does not protect the right to abortion and restricting public funding for the procedure. A similar measure prohibiting public funding of abortion was rejected by voters in Oregon.

Marijuana

Legal weed continues to spread across the US, as four more states voted on legalization. Missouri voted to legalize medical marijuana, and Michigan voted to approve recreational use of the drug. North Dakota, which allows medical marijuana, rejected legalization for recreational purposes. We’re still awaiting results from Utah, where a measures legalizing use for medical purposes is leading the polls.

Immigration

Thirty years after Oregon passed a sanctuary law, barring state and local law enforcement from using public resources for immigration enforcement, voters in the state rejected an attempt to repeal the measure.

Criminal justice

Voters in Louisiana elected to require a unanimous verdict from a 12-person jury for a felony conviction. Juries in the state had previously been allowed to convict with 10 out of 12 votes, a remnant of Jim Crow-era laws that disproportionately affected African Americans.

Minimum wage

It’s not quite $15 an hour, but hundreds of thousands of workers in Arkansas and Missouri will get raises after voters in the two states approved increases to the minimum wages. In Arkansas, the rate will increase from $8.50 to $11 an hour by 2021; in Missouri the wage will ramp up from the current $7.85 to $12 an hour by 2023.

Fossil fuels

A renewable energy measure has failed in Arizona.
 A renewable energy measure has failed in Arizona. Photograph: Sergio Flores/Getty Images

Efforts to curb America’s addiction to fossil fuel consumption saw little success at the ballot box on Tuesday. In Arizona, a well-funded campaign to require electric utilities to get half their power from renewable sources by 2030 was rejected by voters, and in Colorado, a measure to place restrictions on where new oil and gas wells can be located failed to pass.

Missouri and Utah voters also rejected increases on gasoline taxes. Another major environmental initiative – a carbon emissions fee in the state of Washington – is currently trailing. California voters did manage to reject an attempt to repeal the state’s most recent gas tax increase.

Gun control

Washington state enacted tough new gun control laws, increasing the minimum age for purchasing a gun to 21 and establishing background checks and waiting periods.

Animal rights

Chicken farms must convert to cage free in California.
 Chicken farms must be cage-free by 2022. Photograph: Christian Science Monitor/Getty Images

In a blow to factory farms, California’s Proposition 12 passed, establishing minimum space requirements for farm animals. The measure also requires that all egg-laying hens be raised “cage-free” by 2022.

Medicaid expansion

Four states voted on the expansion of Medicaid coverage to more low-income residents, a key aspect of the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare, that many Republican state governments rejected. So far, voters in Nebraska and Idaho have approved the expansion, and the measure is leading in Utah. In Montana, voters are facing a slightly different question: whether to maintain the Medicaid expansion beyond 2019 and fund it through a tobacco tax. That race is still too close to call.

Tampon tax exemption

And in one small victory for women, Nevada voted to exempt feminine hygiene products from state and local sales taxes.

5 THINGS MOST AMERICANS DON’T KNOW ABOUT THEIR COUNTRY AMERICA

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Imagine you have a brother and he’s an alcoholic. He has his moments, but you keep your distance from him. You don’t mind him for the occasional family gathering or holiday. You still love him. But you don’t want to be around him. This is how I lovingly describe my current relationship with the United States. The United States is my alcoholic brother. And although I will always love him, I don’t want to be near him at the moment.

I know that’s harsh, but I really feel my home country is not in a good place these days. That’s not a socioeconomic statement (although that’s on the decline as well), but rather a cultural one.

I realize it’s going to be impossible to write sentences like the ones above without coming across as a raging prick, so let me try to soften the blow to my American readers with an analogy:

You know when you move out of your parents’ house and live on your own, how you start hanging out with your friends’ families and you realize that actually, your family was a little screwed up? As it turns out, stuff you always assumed was normal your entire childhood was pretty weird and may have actually fucked you up a little bit. You know, dad thinking it was funny to wear a Santa Claus hat in his underwear every Christmas or the fact that you and your sister slept in the same bed until you were 22, or that your mother routinely cried over a bottle of wine while listening to Elton John.

The point is we don’t really get perspective on what’s close to us until we spend time away from it. Just like you didn’t realize the weird quirks and nuances of your family until you left and spent time with others, the same is true for country and culture. You often don’t see what’s messed up about your country and culture until you step outside of it.

And so even though this article is going to come across as fairly scathing, I want my American readers to know this: some of the stuff we do, some of the stuff that we always assumed was normal, it’s kind of screwed up. And that’s OK. Because that’s true with every culture. It’s just easier to spot it in others (e.g., the French) so we don’t always notice it in ourselves.

So as you read this article, know that I’m saying everything with tough love, the same tough love with which I’d sit down and lecture an alcoholic family member. It doesn’t mean I don’t love you. It doesn’t mean there aren’t some awesome things about you (BRO, THAT’S AWESOME!!!). And it doesn’t mean I’m some saint either because god knows I’m pretty screwed up (I’m American, after all). There are just a few things you need to hear. And as a friend, I’m going to tell them to you.

And to my foreign readers, get your necks ready, because this is going to be a nod-a-thon.

A Little “What The Hell Does This Guy Know?” Background: I’ve lived in half a dozen states in the US, primarily in the deep south and the northeast. I have visited 45 of the US’s 50 states. I also lived abroad for several years, primarily in South America and Asia (with various stints in Europe). I speak three languages. I’m married to a foreigner. So I feel like I have a good perspective on the US from both the inside and outside.

(Note: I realize all the things on this list are generalizations and I realize there are always exceptions. I get it. You don’t have to send 55 emails telling me that you and your best friend are exceptions. If you really get that offended from some guy’s blog post, you may want to double-check your life priorities.)

OK, we’re ready now. 10 things Americans don’t know about America.

1. FEW PEOPLE ARE IMPRESSED BY US

Unless you’re speaking with a real estate agent or a prostitute, chances are they’re not going to be excited that you’re American. It’s not some badge of honor we get to parade around. Yes, we had Steve Jobs and Thomas Edison, but unless you actually are Steve Jobs or Thomas Edison (which is unlikely), then most people around the world are simply not going to care. There are exceptions of course. And those exceptions are called English and Australian people. Whoopdie-fucking-doo.

As Americans, we’re brought up our entire lives being taught that we’re the best, we did everything first and that the rest of the world follows our lead. Not only is this not true, but people get irritated when you bring it to their country with you. So don’t.

2. FEW PEOPLE HATE US

Despite the occasional eye-rolling, and complete inability to understand why anyone would vote for George W. Bush (twice), people from other countries don’t hate us either. In fact — and I know this is a really sobering realization for us — most people in the world don’t really think about us or care about us. I know, that sounds absurd, especially with CNN and Fox News showing the same 20 angry Arab men on repeat for ten years straight. But unless we’re invading someone’s country or threatening to invade someone’s country (which is likely), then there’s a 99.99% chance they don’t care about us. Just like we rarely think about the people in Bolivia or Mongolia, most people don’t think about us much. They have jobs, kids, house payments — you know, those things called lives — to worry about. Kind of like us.

Americans tend to assume that the rest of the world either loves us or hates us (this is actually a good litmus test to tell if someone is conservative or liberal). The fact is, most people feel neither. Most people don’t think much about us.

Remember that immature girl in high school, how every little thing that happened to her meant that someone either hated her or was obsessed with her; who thought every teacher who ever gave her a bad grade was being totally unfair and everything good that happened to her was because of how amazing she was? Yeah, we’re that immature high school girl.

3. WE KNOW NOTHING ABOUT THE REST OF THE WORLD

For all of our talk about being global leaders and how everyone follows us, we don’t seem to know much about our supposed “followers.” They often have completely different takes on history than we do. Here were some brain-stumpers for me: the Vietnamese were more concerned with independence (not us), Hitler was primarily defeated by the Soviet Union (not us), there is evidence that Native Americans were wiped out largely by disease and plague BEFORE Europeans arrived and not just after, and the American Revolution was partly “won” because the British invested more of their resources in fighting France (not us). Notice a running theme here?

(Hint: It’s not all about us. The world is more complicated.)

We did not invent democracy. We didn’t even invent modern democracy. There were parliamentary systems in England and other parts of Europe over a hundred years before we created a government. In a recent survey of young Americans, 63% could not find Iraq on a map (despite being at war with them), and 54% did not know Sudan was a country in Africa. Yet, somehow we’re positive that everyone else looks up to us.

Condescending Wonka

4. WE ARE POOR AT EXPRESSING GRATITUDE AND AFFECTION

There’s a saying about English-speakers. We say “Go fuck yourself,” when we really mean “I like you,” and we say “I like you,” when we really mean “Go fuck yourself.”

Outside of getting shit-housed drunk and screaming “I LOVE YOU, MAN!”, open displays of affection in American culture are tepid and rare. Latin and some European cultures describe us as “cold” and “passionless” and for good reason. In our social lives, we don’t say what we mean and we don’t mean what we say.

In our culture, appreciation and affection are implied rather than spoken outright. Two guy friends call each other names to reinforce their friendship; men and women tease and make fun of each other to imply interest. Feelings are almost never shared openly and freely. Consumer culture has cheapened our language of gratitude. Something like, “It’s so good to see you” is empty now because it’s expected and heard from everybody.

In dating, when I find a woman attractive, I almost always walk right up to her and tell her that a) I wanted to meet her, and b) she’s beautiful. In America, women usually get incredibly nervous and confused when I do this. They’ll make jokes to defuse the situation or sometimes ask me if I’m part of a TV show or something playing a prank. Even when they’re interested and go on dates with me, they get a bit disoriented when I’m so blunt with my interest. Whereas, in almost every other culture approaching women this way is met with a confident smile and a “Thank you.”

5. THE QUALITY OF LIFE FOR THE AVERAGE AMERICAN IS NOT THAT GREAT

Supposedly, Pablo Escobar once said, “I’m not a rich man; I’m a poor man with a lot of money.”

The United States is not a rich country, it’s a poor country with a lot of money. If you’re extremely talented or intelligent, the US is probably the best place in the world to live. The system is stacked heavily to allow people of talent and advantage to rise to the top quickly.

The problem with the US is that everyone thinks they are of talent and advantage. As John Steinbeck famously said, the problem with poor Americans is that “they don’t believe they’re poor, but rather temporarily embarrassed millionaires.” It’s this culture of self-delusion that allows America to continue to innovate and churn out new industry more than anyone else in the world. But this shared delusion also unfortunately keeps perpetuating large social inequalities and the quality of life for the average citizen lower than most other developed countries. It’s the price we pay to maintain our growth and economic dominance.

To me, being wealthy is having the freedom to maximize one’s life experiences. In those terms, despite the average American having more material wealth than citizens of most other countries (more cars, bigger houses, nicer televisions), their overall quality of life suffers in my opinion. American people on average work more hours with less vacation, spend more time commuting every day, and are saddled with over $10,000 of debt. That’s a lot of time spent working and buying crap and little time or disposable income for relationships, activities, or new experiences.

Bangkok City at night time, Hotel and resident area in the capital of Thailand

Decision Making Guide: How to Make Smart Decisions and Avoid Worst Decision that Will Affect Our Life

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What is Decision Making?

Let’s define decision making. A decision can be defined as a course of action purposely chosen from a set of alternatives to achieve organizational or managerial objectives or goals. Decision making process is continuous and indispensable component of managing any organization or business activities. Decision making is just what it sounds like: the action or process of making decisions. Sometimes we make logical decisions, but there are many times when we make emotional, irrational, and confusing choices. This page covers why we make poor decisions and discusses useful frameworks to expand your decision-making toolbox.

Why We Make Poor Decisions

Tim Ferriss shares a line by one of his mentors in which I feel sets the tone for why this topic is an incredibly important one. His mentor said, “Easy decisions make for a hard life. Hard decisions make for an easy life.” It had me reflecting on some of the decisions and choices I’ve had to make in recent times.

Decision making is one of the most laborious processes I know. For somethings, I can make decisions with relative ease, and for others, it can be a daunting task. I’ve made some excellent choices in life, some inferior ones, and at times when there are tough decisions to make I avoid them like the plague. Why?

I’m always inspired to research motivation and reasons behind why as it relates to how the journey of my life rolls out. How is it possible that by making hard decisions in life we can lead to an easier one? Why do we make poor decisions? In awareness and understanding perhaps I will be able to make wiser decisions moving forward.

In Dan Gilbert’s Ted Talk, titled “Why We Make Poor Decisions,” he shares an insightful formula as to how we calculate the expected value of something. This formula may help us better understand the reasons, errors and the why behind some of the decisions we make.

It was Daniel Bernoulli who apparently came up with this formula. He was an 18th-century Swiss mathematician known for his work on probability and statistics. The recipe looks like this, Expected value = Odds of gain + Value of gain. This relates to the actions or decisions we will likely make.

Here is how it works. If we can calculate the odds and value of any gain, we will be able to know might better how we will behave. For example, if in taking action the odds of something occurring is high and the value we attach to its occurrence is also high, we are likely to make a decision in favor of the action. If these elements are low, we will likely to make poor choices or none at all. At least this is my understanding of the formula.

According to Gilbert, there are a few reasons why people make bad decisions, and usually, it results from an error of judgement. What influences our ability to reason is our upbringing, conditioning, experiences and everything else we’ve been exposed to in life. That is the hard wiring of our brain, and it will affect how we calculate odds of gain and value. Emotions have an important role to play.

Gilbert also said that when we compare we may even make errors in judgment. Comparing is contextual to a particular experience. In one instance the odds may look favorable based on other positive elements occurring at the same time however in different contextual circumstances it may not be so.

There is the social comparison that effects our decisions and comparison to our experience. For example, many of our purchasing decisions are driven by social comparison. How will this make me look? Also, if we did or had something in the past that we remember as being good we might decide to purchase or do it again but this time be disappointed because the conditions were not the same.

These factors will contribute to either an overestimation or underestimation of odds and misrepresented perception of value.

Having experienced something more frequently in life, we will be in a better position to calculate the odds of it happening. For those things we are unfamiliar with it is more challenging to do this. For example, I can safely predict the odds of how good I will feel after going for a run in the morning, something I do a few times a week. On the other hand, waking up to go for a surf, something I’ve never done, will be more difficult to determine the expected value.

However, I can form assumptions based on my interactions with other surfers and their shared experiences and my knowledge that exercise and swimming in the ocean positively influence how I feel. In practice, I will be better able to calculate the odds. It reinforces to me why it is important to experiment and try things in life before ruling out possibilities that may lead to regret.

If we can easily see that the gain of something happening is more likely to occur because it has been something we’ve been more heavily exposed to or experienced, that will increase the overall expected value and the motivation to act. However, the odds of gain are based less on calculated fact and more so driven by emotions. In my experience, even with hard evidence, emotion usually overrules.

According to Lisa Feldman-Barrett, the theory that emotions are hard-wired is flawed. She proposes the constructionist theory which states that emotions are learned and built over a lifetime of experiences. Neuroscience research has found that emotions result from numerous brain networks working in tandem and influenced by “effect” – the mind and body relationships to stimuli.

As mammals, in life, we are influenced by the need to survive. To do this, we seek to fulfil our fundamental needs that are purposeful to our survival. Reward and punishment drive our actions. The brain functions as an efficiency tool. To help us remember what is good or bad and hence improve our ability to survive. The issue is that it is not necessarily always right.

The brain, now filled with pre-conditioned tendencies, will interact with the external environment and how the body feels to produce emotions, either positive or negative. Emotion will powerfully motivate our decisions, and how well we determine the odds of gain and value of gain despite evidence or fact, that may suggest otherwise.

How many times do we do, say, eat, or think things that even against our best judgment we still proceed? When angry I may lash out violently, and yet I know it’s not the best solution. When tired or sad I eat unhealthy foods or drink despite my knowledge that such things are not suitable for me long-term. I buy something that I want in anticipation of how happy it will make me feel and yet a couple of days or hours later I’ve forgotten all about it. I realize that most of what I think I want is driven by perceived needs and that without it I wouldn’t be any worse off.

In summary, and this may sound obvious to many of you, emotions affect the quality of decisions we make in life. Emotions affect the quality of life. I believe that with increased awareness and growth in our knowledge we will be able to understand better how our emotions work and therefore how they direct our decisions. From there, may we all make better decisions and live a life with greater freedom, fulfillment and happiness.

I like to think of myself as a rational person and reasonable person, but I’m not one and I am not perfect. The good news is it’s not just me — or you. We are all irrational. For a long time, researchers and economists believed that humans made logical, well-considered decisions. In recent decades, however, researchers have uncovered a wide range of mental errors that derail our thinking. The articles below outline where we often go wrong and what to do about it.

  • 5 Common Mental Errors That Sway You From Making Good Decisions: Let’s talk about the mental errors that show up most frequently in our lives and break them down in easy-to-understand language. This article outlines how survivorship bias, loss aversion, the availability heuristic, anchoring, and confirmation bias sway you from making good decisions.
  • How to Spot a Common Mental Error That Leads to Misguided Thinking: Hundreds of psychology studies have proven that we tend to overestimate the importance of events we can easily recall and underestimate the importance of events we have trouble recalling. Psychologists refer to this little brain mistake as an “illusory correlation.” In this article, we talk about a simple strategy you can use to spot your hidden assumptions and prevent yourself from making an illusory correlation.
  • Two Harvard Professors Reveal One Reason Our Brains Love to Procrastinate: We have a tendency to care too much about our present selves and not enough about our future selves. If you want to beat procrastination and make better long-term choices, then you have to find a way to make your present self act in the best interest of your future self. This article breaks down three simple ways to do just that.

How to Use Mental Models for Smart Decision Making

The smartest way to improve your decision making skills is to learn mental models. A mental model is a framework or theory that helps to explain why the world works the way it does. Each mental model is a concept that helps us make sense of the world and offers a way of looking at the problems of life.

You can learn more about mental models, read how Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman uses mental models, or browse a few of the most important mental models below.

Top Mental Models to Improve Your Decision Making

  • Margin of Safety: Always Leave Room for the Unexpected
  • How to Solve Difficult Problems by Using the Inversion Technique
  • Elon Musk and Bill Thurston on the Power of Thinking for Yourself

Best Decision Making Books

  • Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
  • Poor Charlie’s Almanack by Charles T. Munger
  • Seeking Wisdom by Peter Bevelin
  • Decisive by Chip Heath and Dan Heath

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Personal Continuous Improvement To Our Life: How It Works and How to Manage It?

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What is Continuous Improvement?

Let’s define continuous improvement. Continuous improvement is a dedication to making small changes and improvements every day, with the expectation that those small improvements will add up to something significant.

The typical approach to self-improvement is to set a large goal, then try to take big leaps in order to accomplish the goal in as little time as possible. While this may sound good in theory, it often ends in burnout, frustration, and failure. Instead, we should focus on continuous improvement by slowly and slightly adjusting our normal everyday habits and behaviors.

It is so easy to dismiss the value of making slightly better decisions on a daily basis. Sticking with the fundamentals is not impressive. Falling in love with boredom is not sexy. Getting one percent better isn’t going to make headlines.

There is one thing about it though: it works.

How Does Continuous Improvement Work?

So often we convince ourselves that change is only meaningful if there is some large, visible outcome associated with it. Whether it is losing weight, building a business, traveling the world or any other goal, we often put pressure on ourselves to make some earth-shattering improvement that everyone will talk about.

Meanwhile, improving by just 1 percent isn’t notable (and sometimes it isn’t even noticeable). But it can be just as meaningful, especially in the long run.

The power of tiny gains

In the beginning, there is basically no difference between making a choice that is 1 percent better or 1 percent worse. (In other words, it won’t impact you very much today.) But as time goes on, these small improvements or declines compound and you suddenly find a very big gap between people who make slightly better decisions on a daily basis and those who don’t.

Here’s the punchline:

If you get one percent better each day for one year, you’ll end up thirty-seven times better by the time you’re done.

This is why small choices don’t make much of a difference at the time, but add up over the long-term.

For much more on this concept (and an example of a coach who used it achieve huge Olympic success), read this: This Coach Improved Every Tiny Thing by 1 Percent and Here’s What Happened.

Continuous Improvement Tools

Now, let’s talk about a few quick steps you can take right now to start focusing on continuous improvement.

Step 1: Do more of what already works

We often waste the resources and ideas at our fingertips because they don’t seem new and exciting.

There are many examples of behaviors, big and small, that have the opportunity to drive progress in our lives if we just did them with more consistency. Flossing every day. Never missing workouts. Performing fundamental business tasks each day, not just when you have time. Apologizing more often. Writing Thank You notes each week.

Progress often hides behind boring solutions and underused insights. You don’t need more information. You don’t need a better strategy. You just need to do more of what already works.

Step 2: Avoid tiny losses

In many cases, improvement is not about doing more things right, but about doing fewer things wrong.

This is a concept called improvement by subtraction, which is focused on doing less of what doesn’t work: eliminating mistakes, reducing complexity, and stripping away the inessential.

Here are some examples:

  • Education: Avoid stupid mistakes, make fewer mental errors.
  • Investing: Never lose money, limit your risk.
  • Web Design: Remove the on-page elements that distract visitors.
  • Exercise: Miss fewer workouts.
  • Nutrition: Eat fewer unhealthy foods.

In the real world, it is often easier to improve your performance by cutting the downside rather than capturing the upside. Subtraction is more practical than addition.

One of the best ways to make big gains is to avoid tiny losses.

Step 3: Measure backward

We often measure our progress by looking forward. We set goals. We plan milestones for our progress. Basically, we try to predict the future to some degree.

There is an opposite and, I think, more useful approach: measure backward, not forward.

Measuring backward means you make decisions based on what has already happened, not on what you want to happen.

Here are a few examples:

  • Weight Loss: Measure your calorie intake. Did you eat 3,500 calories per day last week? Focus on averaging 3,400 per day this week.
  • Strength Training: Oh, you squatted 250 pounds for 5 sets of 5 reps last week? Give 255 pounds a try this week.
  • Relationships: How many new people did you meet last week? Zero? Focus on introducing yourself to one new person this week.
  • Entrepreneurship: You only landed two clients last week while your average is five? It sounds like you should be focused on making more sales calls this week.

Measure backward and then get a little bit better. What did you do last week? How can you improve by just a little bit this week?

Step 4: Always Think Positive

Positive thinking is a mental and emotional attitude that focuses on the bright side of life and expects positive results. A person with positive thinking mentality anticipates happiness, health and success, and believes that he or she can overcome any obstacle and difficulty.

Always thinking positive even it hard times and challenging moments in life, business, career, and with the family have a great impact to once life and future. Think positive will bring you to success and tremendous change in life. Having a positive mindset and positive upbringing will surely make influence others specially those around you.

Step 5: Be Strong and Never Give Up

Never Give Up means believing in yourself. It means willingness to accept “failure” so you can learn the critical skill of adaptation. It means not compromising on your most important values, and walking the walk, rather than just talking the talk. It means living the life you want and are passionate about.

Being Strong means able to perform a specified action well and powerfully. Having a strong will personality makes you surpass hardships in life and keep the head high while the foot on the ground. Being strong does not give people the right to suppress other but instead to be the light and inspiration for other people. Strong will person have a good leadership treats.

Here are 8 effective ways to become more mentally strong:

  1. Focus on the moment.
  2. Embrace adversity.
  3. Exercise your mind.
  4. Challenge yourself.
  5. Respond positively.
  6. Be mindful.
  7. Don’t be defeated by fear.
  8. Be aware of self-talk.

Everything really relies to the person involved and it need great courage to keep on improving ourselves and to never say “I give up”.